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When Is Trademark Infringement A Concern?

Trademark infringement is a concern when a person or entity uses a trademark in a manner that is likely to cause confusion among consumers about the source, sponsorship, or affiliation of the goods or services being offered.


Trademark infringement occurs when a person or entity uses a trademark that is identical or substantially similar to a registered trademark, or to a trademark that is the subject of a pending trademark application, in connection with goods or services that are related to those covered by the registered or pending trademark.


Trademark infringement is a concern when it is likely to cause consumer confusion about the source, sponsorship, or affiliation of the goods or services being offered. This can occur when the infringing trademark is used on goods or services that are similar to those covered by the registered or pending trademark, or when the infringing trademark is used in a manner that is likely to create an association with the registered or pending trademark in the minds of consumers.


In order to determine whether trademark infringement is a concern, it is necessary to consider the specific circumstances of the case, including the nature of the goods or services being offered, the similarity of the trademarks, and the likelihood of consumer confusion. It is a good idea to consult with a trademark attorney or other professional to assess the risk of trademark infringement and to determine the appropriate steps to take to protect your trademark rights.

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